Glucomannan

PEhttps://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/patienthandout.aspx?productid=205&lang=enGlucomannan3-4g | QD | – | DiabetesGlucomannan appears to beneficially affect total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, body weight, and FBG,https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18842808/N65131 – 2gGlucommanan
Now
Glucomannan (from Konjac Root) (Amorphophallus konjac)
3caps 1-2xQD | 60caps | $21.99
https://www.herbspro.com/products/glucommanan-180-caps?_pos=5&_sid=f850cd9fb&_ss=r
PEhttps://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/patienthandout.aspx?productid=205&lang=enGlucomannan3-4g | QD | – | DiabetesGlucomannan appears to beneficially affect total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, body weight, and FBG,https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18842808/N65131 – 2gGlucommanan
Now
Glucomannan (from Konjac Root) (Amorphophallus konjac)
3caps 1-2xQD | 60caps | $21.99
https://www.herbspro.com/products/glucommanan-180-caps?_pos=5&_sid=f850cd9fb&_ss=r

Glucomannan: A High Fiber Substitute for Corn Starch

Glucomannan is a type of soluble fiber. It’s derived from the root of the konjac plant. This fiber is known for its ability to absorb water and form a gel-like substance, making it popular for weight loss and digestive health. Research on glucomannan shows that it can lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, body weight, and fasting blood sugar. Reference: [PMID: 18842808]

Available On Amazon (Affiliate Link)

Glucomannan/Konjac Root Fiber

You can purchase Konjac Root Powder on Amazon with our affiliate link. It is said to make a very good substitute for cornstarch in recipes.

Here are the approximate nutritional values for 1 tablespoon (9 grams) of konjac root flour:

  • Calories: 30
  • Protein: 0g
  • Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 9g
  • Fiber: 9g
  • Sugar: 0g

Shirataki Noodles * (aka Miracle Noodles) Are Made of Glucomannan (Konjak)

An 8-ounce serving of Shirataki noodles contains only 20 calories, but an impressive total of 6 grams of fiber. You can order Shirataki noodles or rice on Amazon through our affiliate link.


Research Dose:

What Is Glucomannan?

Glucomannan is a natural fiber that comes from the root of a plant called konjac. It is often used as a dietary supplement because it can help with weight loss and other health issues. When you eat glucomannan, it absorbs water and forms a gel-like substance in your stomach. This can help you feel full, which may make it easier for you to eat less and lose weight.

Glucomannan can also help with other health problems like constipation and high cholesterol. It does this by slowing down the digestion process, which helps your body get rid of waste and keeps your cholesterol levels in check.

You can find glucomannan in supplement form at health food stores or online. It’s also used as an ingredient in some foods like noodles and jelly candies. Remember, before starting any new supplement or making changes to your diet, it’s important to talk to your doctor or a healthcare professional.

What are the Benefits of Glucomannan?

  • Helps with weight loss: Glucomannan makes you feel full, which can help you eat less and lose weight.
  • Relieves constipation: This natural fiber adds bulk to your stool, making it easier to pass.
  • Lowers cholesterol: Glucomannan can help reduce bad cholesterol levels in your blood.
  • Controls blood sugar: It may help keep your blood sugar levels stable, which is important for people with diabetes.
  • Supports gut health: Glucomannan feeds good bacteria in your gut, promoting a healthy digestive system.

The Different Forms of Glucomannan: What are the Benefits and Drawbacks of Each?

  • Powder:
    • Benefits: Easy to mix with food or drink, can control the amount used.
    • Drawbacks: Can clump if not mixed properly, measuring can be messy.
  • Capsules:
    • Benefits: Convenient and easy to take, pre-measured dosage.
    • Drawbacks: Not as flexible for adjusting the amount, swallowing capsules might be difficult for some.
  • Tablets:
    • Benefits: Simple to take, pre-measured dosage.
    • Drawbacks: Can be harder to swallow than capsules, not as adjustable for dosage.
  • Konjac noodles or shirataki noodles:
    • Benefits: Low-calorie and low-carb alternative to regular pasta, can be incorporated into meals.
    • Drawbacks: Some people may not like the texture, needs to be rinsed well to remove odor.
  • Jelly candies:
    • Benefits: Tasty way to consume glucomannan, appealing to those with a sweet tooth.
    • Drawbacks: May contain added sugars, not as much glucomannan per serving compared to other forms.

Is Glucomannan Safe?

  • Diabetes medications:
    • Interaction: Glucomannan can lower blood sugar, which might affect the way diabetes medications work.
    • Severity: Moderate, could cause low blood sugar if not monitored.
  • Blood pressure medications:
    • Interaction: Glucomannan might lower blood pressure, affecting the effectiveness of these medications.
    • Severity: Moderate, could lead to low blood pressure if not monitored.
  • Cholesterol-lowering medications:
    • Interaction: Glucomannan can help lower cholesterol, potentially impacting the effectiveness of these medications.
    • Severity: Moderate, might require dosage adjustment.
  • Oral medications:
    • Interaction: Glucomannan can reduce the absorption of some oral medications, making them less effective.
    • Severity: Moderate to severe, depending on the medication involved.

Remember, this is not a complete list, and other medications might also interact with glucomannan. If you’re considering taking glucomannan, it’s important to discuss it with your doctor or pharmacist to ensure it’s safe for you, especially if you’re taking other medications.

Medication Interactions with Glucomannan

  • Psyllium:
    • Interaction: Both are dietary fibers, and combining them may cause too much bulk, leading to digestive discomfort.
  • Inulin:
    • Interaction: Similar to psyllium, inulin is a fiber that could cause digestive issues if taken together with glucomannan.
  • Activated charcoal:
    • Interaction: Activated charcoal can bind to glucomannan and reduce its effectiveness.
  • Calcium and other minerals:
    • Interaction: Glucomannan might reduce the absorption of minerals like calcium, leading to a lower intake than needed.

If you’re considering taking glucomannan along with other supplements, it’s important to discuss it with your doctor or a healthcare professional to ensure it’s safe for you.

Food Sources of Glucomannan

These amounts can vary based on the brand or how the food is prepared.

Food SourceAmount of Glucomannan
Konjac noodles (1 cup)2-4 grams
Shirataki noodles (1 cup)2-4 grams
Konjac jelly (1 piece)1-2 grams
Konjac rice (1 cup)2-3 grams

Please note that the primary source of glucomannan is the konjac root, and it is not commonly found in many other natural foods. The foods listed in the table are made from konjac root and processed to form different products.

About the Author

Supplement Sciences

Staff Authors at Nutriscape have been working on this article and it is still a work in progress. Please feel free to login and comment on what you see so far.

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